Winner of the International Banker 2021 Western & Eastern European Awards

IIn the light of the recent United Nations climate change conference, COP26, held in Glasgow, Scotland, many of the most notable banking activities in recent times have been lenders’ commitments to address climate risks. In the UK, for example, Bank of England (BoE) Governor Andrew Bailey confirmed in early November that he would be looking at how UK financial institutions perceive such risks and stressed that the problems were already affecting the UK economy. “As of the beginning of 2022, we will change gears in our domestic supervisory approach to ensure that companies identify and address climate-related financial risks,” said Bailey in his address on November 3rd at the conference.

Several UK banks have also joined a global alliance aimed at ending reliance on coal power around the world. HSBC Group, Lloyds Banking Group and NatWest Group are among the 10 financial institutions to join the Powering Past Coal Alliance (PPCA) founded by the UK and Canada in 2017.

French banks came under fire from the country’s financial regulators in the run-up to COP26, particularly because of the vagueness of their climate commitments. According to the Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) and Autorité de Contrôle Prudentiel et de Résolution (ACPR), which issued a joint report on October 26, financial institutions (FIs) did provide clear information on exit dates from the coal industry last year, but their policies remain inconsistent and often lack transparency. The report recommended that FIs agree on common definitions in order to measure exposure to fossil fuels and to cover the entire value chain.

French lenders will maintain their third quarter loan loss provisions (LLPs) along with their Spanish competitors in 2022 as they remain on hold on the impact of the coronavirus pandemic. Although other European lenders have started releasing some of these funds as lockdowns have ended and economic activity returns with some vigor, French and Spanish banks were among the most cautious in the region, ranking seven of the top ten spots in risk provisioning for According to S&P Global Market Intelligence, loan defaults in the first six months of the year at the continent’s 25 largest lenders by total assets.

Poland’s largest lenders warned that efforts to boost green finance would require further regulatory support and economic incentives, especially if the Polish banking sector is to successfully reduce its reliance on coal. According to Eurostat, the country accounted for 96 percent of total hard coal production in the European Union (EU) and 43 percent of total EU hard coal consumption last year. And figures from the Polish climate protection organization Rozwój Tak-Odkrywki Nie (RT-ON) put the value of loans to Polish companies involved in dirty, mainly coal-related investments at around 36 billion zlotys (9.06 billion US dollars) between October 2018 ). and October 2020.

After the Czech central bank, the Czech National Bank (CNB), raised its two-week benchmark interest rate by 75 basis points in late September – the largest increase in almost a quarter of a century – the Czech Bankers Association (CBA) announced that the switch will have the biggest impact on corporate lending , while the impact on mortgages will be less pronounced as they are more responsive to longer-term interest rates. “This means that mortgage interest rates will continue to rise moderately and thus continue the trend of the last few months. However, there is no need to worry that mortgage rates will rise as quickly as the CNB increases its rates, ”the association concluded. Further rate hikes are widely expected, with Bloomberg News quoting CNB Governor Jiří Rusnok, stating that future decisions would be made based on the size and frequency of further rate hikes.

The largest Austrian banks will also benefit significantly from the CNB’s rate hike, especially given their sizeable presence in the Czech Republic. Erste Group Bank and Raiffeisen Bank International (RBI) in particular rely on the country as an important foreign market with around 4.5 million Czech customers and the latter with 1.4 million customers. According to data from S&P Global Market Intelligence, the first generated 382 million in income in the second quarter.

Sberbank Europe AG, a subsidiary of Russia’s largest bank, recently confirmed that it will sell some of its banks in Central and Eastern Europe with total assets of 7.33 billion euros (8.51 billion US dollars). The sales will be completed to allow Sberbank to focus on key markets and explore new business models. The banks to be sold are located in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Hungary, Serbia and Slovenia with a total of 162 branches and around 600,000 customers at the end of 2020. And they will be transferred to AIK Banka ad Beograd, Gorenjska Banka dd, Kranj. and Agri Europe Cyprus Ltd., the sale of which is expected to close in the next year.

>>> WINNER OF THE WESTERN EUROPE AWARDS

BANKING CEO OF THE YEAR
Western Europe
Mr. Frank Vang-Jensen

Nordea Bank plc (Finland)

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BEST CUSTOMER SERVICE
PROVIDER OF THE YEAR

Western Europe
Commerzbank AG (Germany)

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Best banking group Austria
Erste Group Bank AG

Best banking group in the Netherlands
ING Groep NV

Best Investment Bank of the Year Greece
AXIA Ventures Group

Best Investment Bank of the Year Italy
Mediobanca

Best Investment Bank of the Year Portugal
Banco Invest

Best Investment Bank of the Year Switzerland
Swiss credit

Best Investment Bank of the Year Turkey
ICBC Turkey

Best Investment Bank of the Year Great Britain
Barclays

Best Commercial Bank of the Year in France
BNP Paribas

Best Commercial Bank of the Year Ireland
Bank of Ireland

Best Commercial Bank of the Year Malta
BNF Bank

Best Commercial Bank of the Year Sweden
Commercial banks

Best Commercial Bank of the Year Turkey
ICBC Turkey

Best private bank of the year Austria
First private banking

Best Private Bank of the Year France
BNP Paribas private bank

Best Private Bank of the Year Portugal
Banco Finantia

Best Private Bank of the Year Switzerland
Piguet Galland & Cie SA

Best UK Private Bank of the Year
Couts & Co.

Best innovation in retail banking Denmark
Danske Bank A / S

Best innovation in retail banking in France
Agricultural credit

Best innovation in retail banking Malta
BNF Bank

Best innovation in retail banking in Spain
Santander Bank

Best innovation in private customer business in Turkey
TurkishBank Group

>>> WINNER OF THE EASTERN EUROPE AWARD

BANKING CEO OF THE YEAR
Eastern Europe
Mr. Omer trigger

Banca Transilvania (Romania)

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BEST CUSTOMER SERVICE
PROVIDER OF THE YEAR

Eastern Europe
Alfa Bank (Russia)

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Best banking group in Hungary
OTP group

Best Investment Bank of the Year Croatia
Zagrebačka banka

Best Commercial Bank of the Year Albania
National Commercial Bank (BKT)

Best Commercial Bank of the Year Bulgaria
UniCredit Bulbank

Best Commercial Bank of the Year Croatia
OTP bank

Best commercial bank of the year in the Czech Republic
eská spořitelna

Best Commercial Bank of the Year Estonia
LZV bank

Best Commercial Bank of the Year Georgia
Bank of Georgia

Best Commercial Bank of the Year Poland
PKO Bank Polski

Best Commercial Bank of the Year Serbia
AIK bank

Best Private Bank of the Year Croatia
Zagrebačka banka

Best private bank of the year in the Czech Republic
SOB

Best Private Bank of the Year Georgia
TBC bank

Best Private Bank of the Year Hungary
OTP private bank

Best innovation in private banking Bulgaria
UniCredit Bulbank

Best innovation in private customer business Croatia
First Bank

Best innovation in private customer business in the Czech Republic
Commercial bank

Best innovation in private banking Estonia
Coop Pank

Best innovation in private banking Georgia
Bank of Georgia

Best innovation in retail banking Poland
Bank Pekao

Best innovation in private customer business Romania
Banca Transilvania

Best innovation in retail banking in Russia
Alfa Bank

Best innovation in retail banking Ukraine
PrivatBank

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