Failure to restrain dogs in cars is a violation of highway code, could result in a fine of up to £ 5,000 and void your car insurance

Failure to properly strap pets into the car could void your car insurance or fined you up to £ 5,000.

While drivers can be meticulous about buckling up themselves or children, failing to secure animal passengers can become a very costly mistake.

Drivers distracted by their pet being loose in the car run the risk of breaking traffic laws, voiding insurance, or having problems with the police

Given the huge increase in pet ownership since the pandemic and the fact that many families are planning a vacation near their home due to the coronavirus, comparison service Uswitch expects more road users than ever to travel with pets as we approach the warmer months .

And it’s not just dogs that should be reasonably safe in a vehicle.
Everything from a cat to a hamster falls under Rule 57 of the Highway Code, which says that while there is nothing wrong with taking your furry friend for a ride, he must be safe in the car.

The rule posted on the government’s road safety website is, “When you are in a vehicle, make sure that dogs or other animals are properly restrained so they don’t distract you while you are driving, or…” Injury yourself or yourself if you stop quickly.

“A seat belt, a pet owner, a dog cage, or a dog guard are a means of restraining animals in cars.”

According to the road traffic regulations according to rule 57, all animals in the car should be kept in a suitable mannerAccording to the road traffic regulations according to rule 57, all animals in the car should be kept in a suitable manner

While traffic law violation does not result in a direct penalty, drivers risk other fines and penalties if their pet is found to have distracted them while driving.

Drivers are stopped by the police because they do not have proper control of a vehicle or because they drive without care and attention. Costly violations of points on a driver’s license can ultimately result in a driving ban and / or a fine of up to £ 5,000 if a case goes to court.

And if your pet’s behavior in the car is found to have caused or contributed to an accident, the car insurance may also be void, as may the pet insurances you have taken out.

With more new pet owners taking to the streets this summer than ever before, drivers are encouraged to prepare for thisWith more new pet owners taking to the streets this summer than ever before, drivers are encouraged to prepare for this

Joel Kempson, a car insurance expert at Uswitch, advises anyone likely to have a pet on board this summer to speak to their insurance companies and appointments on some rehearsal trips.

He stated, “Now the weather is getting warmer and the holiday season is approaching. It is important to keep in mind that some lockdown pets may not have experienced many road trips. To avoid accidents, take your pets with you on shorter trips before you set off on vacation to get them used to exercise.

“When driving, it is better to be prepared and to drive slowly. Planning and investing in the right equipment to keep your pets safe can save a lot of hassle in the long run – as can checking with your insurer to see if your pets are insured. “

Drivers are advised to invest in either a quality harness, crate, or shelter to protect a pet while driving.Drivers are advised to invest in either a quality harness, crate, or shelter to protect a pet while driving.

DogsTrust introduced its own “Houndway Code” prior to peak travel times in recent summers to remind drivers the best way to travel with a dog on board. You can find more information about this campaign here.

Roadside Assistance The RAC also reminds motorists visiting its website that improperly restraining their dog can create a risk of breaking the law.

In addition to advice on choosing a good quality harness, crate, or protection to keep a pet safe, there are a number of other tips that drivers should keep in mind when traveling with animals.

Buying travel bowls for water, making regular stops, using shutters to block direct sunlight, paying attention to the relaxation of furry friends, considering motion sickness, and using the car for more than vet visits to prevent animals from traveling with you Associating distress are also all advised.

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